darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris
Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).


His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.
De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Fortunis Licetus De Monstris

Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657) was an Italian philosopher, doctor and scientist. He studied medicine and philosophy at the University of Bologna before becoming a lecturer of logic at the University of Pisa and then a professor of philosophy at the University of Padua. Liceti was omnivorous in his interests writing books on mathematics, philosophy, astronomy, genetics and disease. He was friends with Galileo and the mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri, who once remarked that Liceti was such a prodigious scholar that he produced a book a week. It’s certainly true that Liceti did have a rather impressive output of scientific and philosophical texts during his life ranging on subjects as diverse as the immortality of the soul, gem stones and the causes of headaches (which he thought were the microcosmic equivalent of lightning).

His most famous work was De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis (Of the causes of monsters, nature and differences) that documented the many “monstrosities” and deformities reported in nature. The book chimed with the public’s interest in “monsters” and “freaks” and Liceti documented all of the stories of man-beasts, mermaids, wolf children as well as the physical abnormalities he had witnessed (co-joined twins, multiple-limbed children, hermaphrodites and alike). Liceti did not consider these “monstri” as abnormal, but rather as attempts of nature to fashion life as best as possible, in the same way an artist would create art with whatever materials were available.

It is said that I see the convergence of both Nature and art, because one or the other not being able to make what they want, they at least make what they can.

He was also the first to posit the idea that fetal disease could lead to abnormalities in children.

De monstrorum causis, natura et differentiis was first published in 1616 without illustrations, a lavish illustrated second edition was published in Padua in 1634, with a further edition De monstris (or what you might call the mass market edition) was produced in Amsterdam in 1665. It is from the last edition that these incredible images are from.

magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.
magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.

magictransistor:

Atlas Novus Sive Theatrum Orbis Terrarum & Atlas Novus Terrarum Orbis Imperia Rega et Status (Various hand-colored engravings), c. 1542-1647.

deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
deathstarwaltz:

Art by J. R. R. Tolkien 
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.
magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.

magictransistor:

Thomas Wright. An Original Theory or New Hypothesis of the Universe. 1750.

Q

flyintosnow asked:

请问下,王瑞林的那个斗战胜佛的雕塑,有哪里能买到么?

A

只有问他自己了,这是2米大的雕塑

magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.
magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.

magictransistor:

Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (Paul Bransom, Arthur Rackham and E.H. Shepard), after 1908.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maria Mikhalskaya
From Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:


On View: Carl Krull’s “Seismic” at V1 Gallery

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014


Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.
Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.
Hi-FructoseFacebookTumblr

littlelimpstiff14u2:

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on October 1, 2014

Carl Krull’s drawings have a visceral appeal. Each of his works is composed of horizontal lines that start out parallel and wrinkle somewhere in the middle, yielding figures as if out of some primordial mass. Sometimes the forms he draws are hardly distinguishable from one other. The eye attempts to untangle his orgiastic cacophony of limbs and biomorphic shapes as if they were some strange riddle. On September 27, Krull debuted his solo show “Seismic” at V1 Gallery in Copenhagen. The pieces evoke both the smooth grooves of cliff sides and the monochromatic markings of seismographs. By setting restrictions on his process (he seems to refuse to take the charcoal off the paper until it has crossed from one side to the other), Krull captures the quality of geological formations and invokes themes of creation and mythology.

Carl Krull’s “Seismic” will be on view through October 25. Photos by Henrik Haven.

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magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.
magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.

magictransistor:

Das Wunderzeichenbuch (The Book of Miracles) Augsburg, ca. 1552.

(via signorcasaubon)

eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]
eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]
eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]
eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]
eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]
eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]
eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  
British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan
Netherlands (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  
Cleveland Museum of Art
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  
The Frick Collection, New York 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
The Emperor Timur Enthroned,
India (1654-56)
Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  
Musée du Louvre, Paris
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback
India (1654-56)
Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 
India (1654-56)
Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  
The British Museum, London 
[x]
Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn
Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh
India (1654-1656)
Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
[x]

eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree

Netherlands (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  

British Museum, London

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan

Netherlands (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  

Cleveland Museum of Art

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword

India (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  

The Frick Collection, New York 

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

The Emperor Timur Enthroned,

India (1654-56)

Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  

Musée du Louvre, Paris

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback

India (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  

The British Museum, London

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 

India (1654-56)

Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  

The British Museum, London 

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh

India (1654-1656)

Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

[x]

(via mughalshit)

magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.
magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.
magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.
magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.
magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.
magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.
magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.

magictransistor:

Manly P. Hall. Collection of Alchemical Manuscripts. Box No. 4. 1600.

magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.
magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.

magictransistor:

William Blake (engraved by Luigi Schiavonetti), Robert Blair’s The Grave (Cromek/Bentley), 1808.

notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!
notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!

notyourdaddy:

I don’t throw this around often, but…..YAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSS!!!

ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE
ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE
ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE
ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE
ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE
ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE
ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE

ooblium:

Selected Plates from Edward Young’s Night Thoughts illustrated by William Blake—VERSION ONE

(via nocnitsa)

magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.
magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.

magictransistor:

Theodor de Bry. Americae Pars Memorabile Provinciæ Brasiliæ Historiam (History of America, Memorable Provinces of Brasil). 1592.